BioBlitz 2017—Johnston

Snake Den Farm, Johnston

Snake Den Farm, Johnston

The 18th annual Rhode Island BioBlitz was held June 9 and 10 at Snake Den State Park in Johnston, with all Science Central activities located at Snake Den Farm on Brown Ave. The local host was the Northern Rhode Island Conservation District along with the Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management. The boundaries of the event, OUT OF BOUNDS areas, Science Central, parking, and other features are noted on the Prelim event map.

This 1,000 acre park, long preserved from development by farmers of the Dame family, is a major natural area close to Providence. There is an extraordinary topography, with rock outcrops, streams, agricultural fields, and woods. After just 24 hours, the species count was 1,073 species. This is the preliminary count, final count awaits final team reports and should be available by January.

Late-night teamwork at RI BioBlitz 2017

Late-night teamwork at RI BioBlitz 2017

It looks like vascular plants could set a record but the insects were a little disappointing, with talented teams struggling to reach RI BioBlitz averages. Perhaps this is a reflection of the fact there is little habitat that’s not either forest or intensively cropped agricultural field. Let’s see what happens as the Northern District continues to implement best practices at the farm over the coming years. Total participation was 185 people from all age groups. Great job everyone!

A great big thank you to our lead sponsor: Roger Williams Park Zoo
zoo logo standard green

Thanks also to our other sponsors:
A.F. Lusi Construction
Rhode Island Beekeepers Association
Largess Forestry
Wicked Tulips Flower Farm
Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management, Division of Agriculture

Spider Team members sweep the fields.

Spider Team members sweep the fields.

AFLusi old1These companies and organizations support scientific understanding of Rhode Island’s biology, geology, and ecosystems, encourage the application of scientific information to environmental conservation challenges, and spread scientific understanding of the environment to the next generation. We’re very grateful.